Shallot Onion
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The name of the shallot derives from the name of the city of Ashkelon (Latin “Ascalon’) in ancient Canaan, in Italian its name is “scalogno”.

Unlike onions where each plant normally forms a single bulb, shallots form clusters of offsets, rather in the manner of garlic.

Shallots are extensively cultivated and much used in cookery, in addition to being pickled. Their flavour is perhaps more delicate than that of onions, perhaps more intense. Certainly it is distinctive. Finely sliced deep-fried shallots are used as a condiment in Asian cuisine. Shallots tend to be considerably more expensive than onions.

Like other onions, when sliced raw shallots release chemicals that irritate the eye, resulting in tears.

In Australia, the Scallion plant is also commonly referred to as a shallot. Allium oschaninii is commonly referred to as a French Shallot.

Botanical Name: Allium cepa var. aggregatum

Alternative Names: Eschallot

Health Benefits

100g of Shallot yields the following:

  • Calories – 72
  • Total Carbs – 6% of DV
  • Protein – 2.5g
  • Vitamin A – 24% of DV
  • Vitamin C – 13% of DV
  • Calcium – 4% of DV
  • Iron – 7% of DV

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Selecting tips

In a pinch, you may substitute green onions for traditional shallots. Shallots are an excellent accompaniment to sweet potatoes.

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