When you eat local and shop local, there is a guarantee that your money stays within the community. ‘A Better Choice’, is the first national advocacy program to represent the independent retailers who supply more than half of Australia’s fresh produce across the country. Buying local is giving back – lending a hand to the young family who run your local fruit store or supporting a third-generation pineapple farmer to get back on their feet.

Still not convinced? Here are a few benefits of buying local:

You’re Buying the Freshest Produce

Knowledge is power when it comes to buying fruit and vegetables. The more you know about where your weekly shop came from, the healthier you’ll be for it. Fresh produce is often delivered within 48 hours of picking to ensure the finest quality produce is ready for you to purchase from your local store. When produce is stored for long periods of time, the nutritional value significantly decreases, and the taste will deteriorate.

You’re Boosting the economy

Local communities benefit from consumer spend in their town. You contribute to creating jobs for local kids, supporting a local business run by a hard-working family, and contribute to long-term prosperity of the local economy. Farmers can receive as little as 3.5 cents of every dollar made at the larger supermarkets, but independent retailers are connected to the central markets system which means the everyone in the fresh produce industry benefits from the growers to your growing family.

You know what you’re buying

Larger supermarket chains often sell their own ‘organic’ or ‘local’ range of produce, and frequently for an additional marked up price. The smaller grocers stock produce from local farmers with less chemicals added, better quality and half the price of your average supermarket chain value.

So next time you’re shopping for fresh, quality produce, try your local independent retailer, it’s A Better Choice for your health, your family and your community.

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